Lab News

September 9, 2019

In London? See our work on Adversarial Machine Learning at the Science Museum

Visitors examine a display that shows a stop sign with stickers at the top and bottom of the sign.

Research exploring adversarial machine learning, or the ability to fool machine learning systems, is on display at the Science Museum in London as part of “Driverless: Who is in Control?” This free exhibit includes a modified stop sign developed by a team of researchers to fool driverless cars into misidentifying it and asks “can self-driving cars see the world as well as you can?”

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January 9, 2019

Join the New Diverse Voices Mailing List!

We’ve started a new mailing list for our Diverse Voices project, DiverseVoices@uw.edu. Through this mailing list you will be able to connect with others interested in the Diverse Voices method, ask questions, and receive information on additional resources. To join the mailing list, go to https://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/diversevoices. Through the mailing list, you will have access to: • Q&A. We […]

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June 22, 2018

What Pushes Back From Considering Materiality In IT?

An interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, information scientists, and planners explores the invisible environmental impacts of digital technologies in What Pushes Back from Considering Materiality in IT?  There are significant negative impacts from extracting, processing, maintaining, and ultimately disposing of the materials used to support information technology, as well as of producing the energy it uses, […]

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December 11, 2017

Robust Physical-World Attacks on Machine Learning Modules

Could graffiti convey a hidden message to your car? Or cause a robot to do something unexpected? Cars and robots, as well as other devices, are more frequently relying on images of their surroundings to make decisions. New research explores the possibility that malicious alterations to real world objects, like the road sign above, could […]

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November 21, 2017

Privacy in Online Dating

How do you manage your privacy in online dating? Chances are that if you use online dating or have considered using it, this is an issue you’ve given some thought. And you wouldn’t be alone, as privacy issues in online dating have appeared in the media—two summers ago, during the Rio Olympics, privacy in online […]

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September 15, 2017

Securing Augmented Reality Output

A year ago, Pokemon Go became immensely popular as players explored their surroundings for Pokemon in the smartphone-based augmented reality (AR) app. This hyper-popular game, which barely scratched the surface of AR’s potential, led to increased interest in the technology. The AR industry is expected to grow to $100 billion by 2020, and with increasing interest in AR automotive windshields and head-mounted displays (HMDs), we could soon be able to experience immersive AR environments like the one depicted by designer and film-maker Keiichi Matsuda in Hyper Reality.

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February 28, 2017

Toys That Listen — CHI 2017

What do teddy bears, My Friend Cayla and Barbie have in common? They are all toys connected to the internet that can listen, overhearing what goes on in the home. Security breaches and the privacy challenges of these devices are regularly in the news. During the holiday season of 2015 Hello Barbie faced significant pushback […]

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July 17, 2016

PokemonGO and Policy for Augmented Reality Applications

With widespread adoption, PokemonGO has brought the novel policy considerations of augmented reality to a wide audience. Over the last week, members of the Lab have highlighted some of these issues. Co-Director Calo, noted the novel nature of a game that requires players to physically travel and potentially actionable nuisance created by the developers (Verge). In an article in New Scientist, Emily McReynolds highlighted the benefits of including a diverse set of stakeholders in the design of these applications.

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May 27, 2016

Artificial Intelligence: Law and Policy

On Tuesday, May 24, the Lab and the UW School of Law co-hosted the first of four White House public workshops on artificial intelligence. Deputy CTO Ed Felton and other members of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy spoke on panels and were in attendance for the workshop. Other speakers included Lab Co-Director Ryan Calo, Oren Etzioni, Kellye Testy, R. David Edelman, Pedro Domingos, Deirdre Mulligan, Kate Crawford, Jack Balkin, and Camille Fischer.

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January 22, 2016

Toys That Listen and the Internet of Things

Hello Barbie, Amazon Echo, and the home robot Jibo are part of a new wave of connected toys and gadgets for the home that listen. Different than the smartphone, these devices are always on, blending into the background until needed by the adult or child user. We do not yet know all the information our new toys are collecting, storing, or disclosing. With an intended audience of designers and regulators, this project brings an interdisciplinary group of experts together to build a set of consumer protection best practices for design and user control of connected devices in the home.

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